OCEAN FILTERED WATER

Malta is regarded as a dry island, having no surface waters like lakes, rivers, or reservoirs they have to use the ocean as their source for freshwater together with underground water. One of the most interesting facts about Malta is that they filter their drinking water straight from the ocean.

Malta uses reverse osmosis to filter the ocean into safe drinking tap water. For this reason, some travelers do not like the taste.

 

KINNIE DRINK

This soft drink made of orange and bitters is a national favorite in Malta. Everywhere you look at restaurants or the beach people are out enjoying a Kinnie. It is best enjoyed as cold as possible.

 

UNDERGROUND TUNNELS OF VALLETTA

The streets of Valletta are impressive but the network of underground tunnels are just as impressive. It all started during the Great Siege of Malta in 1565.

Both the attacking Ottomans and Knights of St. John were digging tunnels to get underneath the city. Afterward, the Knights continued to build tunnels for defense purposes and created underground cisterns for fresh water.

The drainage systems were also seen as far more advanced than anywhere in Europe at the time. Once the British took control in the 1800’s they added a subterranean railway running from Valletta to suburbs outside of the city. This and other underground tunnels would eventually be used as air-raid shelters during WWII.

 

NATIONAL DISH IS RABBIT STEW

The Phonecians are said to have introduced rabbits to the island over 3,000 years ago. This national dish of Malta is know as Stuffat tal-Fenek and has been enjoyed for centuries

The rabbit is prepared by simmering it in a tasty wine and tomato sauce. Typically it’s accompanied by potatoes and various vegetables mainly peas. Although it’s not as popular these days, you can still find it at traditional restaurants around the country.

 

MALTA WAS A BRITISH COLONY

From 1814 to 1964 Malta was under the British Crown. Great Britain saw Malta as an important colony as it served as the main command post for its navy in the Mediterranean. The English influence is still seen in Malta like driving on the left side of the road, an abundance of English pubs, and even bright red telephone booths scattered around Valletta.

 

MOST HEAVILY BOMBED PLACE IN WWII

Due to its strategic location, Malta was one of the most bombed places on earth during WWII. The relentless air raids happened from 1940-1942 at the hands of the Germans and Italians. There were over 3,300 air raids on Malta and more than 30,000 buildings destroyed.

At one point, Malta was bombed for 154 consecutive days and nights. Unfortunately, many of their most sacred churches and historical sites were destroyed. The fighting stopped in 1942 in Malta, but it would take them years to recover from the destruction.

 

UNIQUE BAKERY TREATS

While there were so many different breads and pastries to try in Malta, the ones that truly stuck out were Pastizzi and Imqaret.

Pastizzi , which is made out of a crispy flakey dough, is cooked hot and fresh in the oven giving it a crunchy taste and is usually filled with ricotta cheese or peas. Imqaret are a traditional Maltese dessert that consist of a fried thin sweet pastry filled with a flavourful spiced date and citrusy paste.

 

SEASON ONE OF GAME OF THRONES 

Game of Thrones in Malta is not promoted anything like in Croatia. but season one of Game of Thrones included many iconic Maltese locations

These include The Gate of Mdina, Mesquita Square in Mdina, St Dominic’s Priory in Rabat, San Anton Palace, Fort St, Angelo, Fort Ricasoli, Fort Manoel, Verdala Palace, The Azure Window, and Mtahleb Cliffs and Valley.

 

BUSH AND GORBACHEV MEETING TO END THE COLD WAR

The Malta Summit was a meeting in 1989 between the American president and Soviet Union leader to bring an end to the Cold War. Bush and Gorbachev met on a warship just off the coast and discussed terms for the 45-year long stalemate. Although it’s debatable if it was the official completion of the Cold War, it signified the beginning to the end of the conflict.

 

MALTA IS 98% ROMAN CATHOLIC

Even with so many cultures inhabiting Malta over the years, the religion is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic. This is traced back to the arrival of St. Paul and only grew bigger by the religious order of the Knights of St. John.

There are around 365 Catholic churches in Malta, one representing each day of the year. Countless celebrations and feasts are held throughout the year in honor of the patron saints.

 

MALTESE ARE NUTS ABOUT EUROVISION

No matter how old or young a Maltese person is, there is no way that they will not know the lyrics to Eurovision songs. There is no chance that any Maltese will miss watching the festival.